Jersey Giants

The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy, also recognized as ALBC, has placed the Jersey Giant on a “Watch List” of Heritage Chicken Breeds. The group seeks to follow the population of particular chickens to ensure that they do not disappear from our American backyards. The Jersey Giant dates back to the mid-to-late 1800’s from breeders in New Jersey wanting to replace the turkey as the big poultry for the dinner table.
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John and Thomas Black of Burlington, NJ created this large, single comb breed and the APA ( American Poultry Association) acknowledged the breed in 1922 (Hobby Farms, Guide to Chicken Breeds). Through observation we have learned that the hens are quiet, lay a medium brown-mauve- colored egg generously. They prefer to roost on top of the nest boxes or hop from there to our roosting bar. Rarely have I seen them fly.
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The roosters are mildly behaved compared to the Ameraucana and Easter Eggers. I would definitely refer to our chosen JG rooster as docile. Their smaller single comb makes them both heat and cold tolerant. They are black with a green sheen to their full feathers. When going through molt, you can see that their insulating feathers are brown. If you pick the them up you will be surprised at how heavy they are compared to other egg laying breeds. The JG can naturally reproduce and so if you are looking for a dual purpose bird that will lay you beautiful eggs and fill a stew pot, I think this is the bird for you.

Easter Egger

In keeping with my goal to have a collection of colorful eggs in every carton, it led me to the Easter Eggers. We got 5 at first and 4 of them grew into cockerels. This lets you know that you cannot tell gender at a young age. In fact until my favorite pullet started to crow, I was convinced I had 2 pullets. Bummer.

Easter Egger Chicken is also commonly referred to as the Ameraucana. The Ameraucana Chicken Breed is recognized by the APA in many different color variations. The breeder I purchased from had a Wheaten rooster over Ameraucana hens. You cannot determine egg color by looking at leg color. Our EE birds have slate colored legs but if you go to their ear, you will see that it is a slightly gray color which is more closely linked to their egg color.

Creme Crested Legbar

The only auto-sexing breed we currently have. Copper, our rooster, was received as “packing peanuts” from a hatchery. He was very tiny and cute which endeared him to our son, Tommy. Copper has a very high pitch cockle doodle do. We bought 6 pullets to accompany him as we learned that telling gender upon hatching was simple and the hens lay a pastel blue egg. What’s not to like about that?